platredeparis:

bnycolew:

mannysiege:

Progress

What

Imma just let this sit here

Read this and let it ruminate.I fucking love science

platredeparis:

bnycolew:

mannysiege:

Progress

What

Imma just let this sit here

Read this and let it ruminate.

I fucking love science

simonliedtke:

johnboy978:

milkteasympathy:

CLOTHING LIFE HACKS

Very cool

Migh be helpful sometimes.

(Source: viekastv)

Anonymous said: is it wrong that I think Abbott's ears are kinda cute?

yes, it is wrong.

ok, I am sorry I shouldn’t say that. His ears are his defining feature and the fact that Tony Abbott is an awful prime minister who was voted in on the back of his daggy dad, good bloke persona doesn’t change that.

The fact he repulses me and makes me feel physically ill doesn’t mean someone else shouldn’t find his ears kinda cute.

Reblog if you think gay marriage should be legal.

consulting-loki:

awindowtothewest:

the-queen-of-anchors:

HOLY FUCK THE NOTES.

image

HOLY SHIT LOOK AT THE NOTES

reblog EVERY TIME THIS IS ON YOUR DASH .

officially beating dean in gym shorts

(Source: inthemidstofmonsters)

  

myangelsdontwearwings:

sickandcool:

shercasm:

tinalikesbutts:

I was mucking around with Audacity, listening to songs in reverse. For the fun of it, I put on everyone’s favorite song, Blurred Lines. And shockingly, I heard something I had never expected to hear. Robin Thicke was fooling us this whole time. He wasn’t trying to be misogynistic, he wanted us to listen closer to the song and understand that he in fact does believe his lady partner needs to be treated with the utmost respect.

You might find it VERY hard to believe, but I implore you to listen very closely (with headphones if you can, because it can be hard to hear). The message I’m talking about comes in around the 30 second mark.

After the 30sec mark I just kind of stared at my wall for the rest of the song trying to accept what I just heard.

IM FUCKING DONE

motherfucker

flatbear:

sigridellis:

satedanbadass:

Jason Momoa and Manu Bennett at Florida Super Con

Those two are both Maori, right? And they are goofily pulling semi-haka-referential moves in these photos, right?

Jason Momoa is Hawaiian, raised in Iowa. Manu Bennet is Australian/Maori (Ngāti Kahungunu and Te Arawa, which is tangentially related to my Iwi).

Manu in particular is referring some classic intimidation poses, especially the tongue (A lot of Maori tribes have a cool genetic trait where the connective skin underneath their tongue is much smaller, or not there at all, to further the intimidation. Mine goes out super far!), and Jason could be doing the same, or referring to native Hawaiian intimidation poses, which I am not familiar with.

A lot of the pacific island cultures are connected and have their own Hakas, Samoan, Fijian, Vanuatan, Tongan and more, all with different names. The one Manu is most likely referencing is Ka Mate, Te Rauparaha’s Haka (also my Iwi/tribe!), the most well known one, which looks like this.

This has been your daily dose of OH MY GOD SOMEONE IS TALKING ABOUT MY TINY COUNTRY LET ME IMMEDIATELY TELL YOU EVERYTHING I KNOW.

tapemaker:

This is the best song for today.

Bic Runga ~ “Drive" (1996)


Let’s not discuss all these things we can’t undo.

Drivingdogs

So apparently the New Zealand SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) has trained a few of their rescue dogs to drive minis …. just too cute, especially Ginny and Porter.

thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photoSill Level: Beginner
Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.
The Basics
You camera has a sensor.

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 
Aperture
The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.
Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.
A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 
A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 
Shutter Speed
Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.
Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.
Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 
Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.
There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 
ISO
ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.
Getting the Balance
A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.
To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 
To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 
If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 
Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 
TL;DR
Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
Not enough light = underexposed
Too much light = overexposed
Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
A large hole is a small f-stop
A small hole is a large f-stop
A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
ISO is the amplification of the sensor
HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result
Photos by Froggie
You can find me here: [tumblr | wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.
If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

thefrogman:

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure: The beginning of a great photo
Sill Level: Beginner

Getting a proper exposure is at the heart of all photography. I will now attempt to explain it in the simplest terms possible.

The Basics

You camera has a sensor.

image

This sensor collects light. Too much light and the image is bright or “overexposed.” Not enough light and your image is dark or “underexposed.”

image

There are 3 main elements that determine your exposure: aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. 

Aperture

The aperture is just an adjustable hole inside your lens that lets in light.

image

The bigger the hole, the more light it can let in. The smaller the hole, the less light it can let in.

Aperture is measured in f-stops. This indicates the size of the hole. Though it seems backwards, a lower number means a bigger hole. A higher number means a smaller hole.

image

Your lens will be rated with its maximum aperture. So if it is a “17-55mm f/4 lens”—that means f/4 is the biggest hole it can make. Most lenses can go to f/22, which would be the smallest hole it can make.

A “fast lens” is one that has a very large maximum aperture. These lenses have an f-stop of 2.8 or lower. They are great for doing photography in low light. 

A large aperture (low f-stop number) can also give you shallow depth of field. This allows you to make your background blurry to better isolate your subjects. 

image

This is a very desirable thing for many photographers, so they try to get the fastest lens they can. 

Shutter Speed

Shutter speed is how long your sensor is exposed to light. Think of two sliding doors in front of the sensor. They open, let in light, and then close. A fast shutter speed lets in very little light. A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light.

Shutter speed is measured in seconds. A fast shutter speed will be a fractional value, like 1/500th of a second. A slow shutter speed can be entire seconds.

Your camera might display fractions as just the bottom number in the fraction. So 1/500th would just show as 500. Whole seconds will have a double quotation mark after. So 5 seconds will appear as 5”. 

Faster shutter speeds let in less light, but will allow you to freeze action.

image

Slower shutter speeds let in more light, allowing you to take images in darker environments. With a long enough exposure, you can make night look like day. 

image

With slow shutter speeds you risk your image blurring due to your hands shaking the camera or movement of the subjects in your photos. So if you do a long exposure, you will almost certainly need a very still subject and a tripod.

There is a formula for keeping camera shake from blurring your photo. You just put 1 over the length of your lens. So if your lens is 50mm, you need a shutter speed of 1/50th or faster. Note: This will not stop blurring due to your subject moving. 

ISO

ISO is the amplification of your sensor. Similar to the volume knob on your radio, ISO amplifies the sensitivity of the sensor so you can increase your shutter speed or make your aperture smaller. It makes the light “louder.” However, this can come at a cost. The more you amplify the sensor, the more noise will show up in your image.

image

Some cameras can go to a very high ISO and have very little noise. These cameras are usually frickin’ expensive. As technology advances, cheaper cameras get better and have less noise at higher ISOs.

Getting the Balance

A proper exposure requires balancing aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to get your desired result.

To get shallow depth of field you’ll need a large aperture. So you make your f-stop the lowest number possible. But that lets in a lot of light, so you need a fast shutter speed to balance it out. 

To take a long exposure, your shutter speed will now let in a ton of light. To keep from overexposing you may need to make your aperture very small so the image does not overexpose. 

If it is darker and things are moving, you’ll need a fast shutter speed and a large aperture. But you can’t get a fast enough shutter speed to avoid blur. So you raise your ISO to amplify the light, allow you to get the proper exposure, and keep your subjects from blurring. Yes, it will cause your image to have some noise, but it is a worthy compromise to get the image you desire. 

Photography is often about making compromises. Sacrificing a little bit of quality in one area to create the intended effect with a proper exposure. Learning this balancing act can take years to truly master and in further posts I will go deeper into how to figure out how to get the best exposure possible for any situation. 

TL;DR

  • Exposure is the amount of light captured on your sensor or film
  • Not enough light = underexposed
  • Too much light = overexposed
  • Aperture is the hole in your lens that lets in different amounts of light
  • A large hole is a small f-stop
  • A small hole is a large f-stop
  • A large hole creates shallow depth of field (sharp subject, blurry background)
  • A shutter opens and closes to expose your sensor for different amounts of time
  • A fast shutter speed freezes motion, but lets in less light
  • A slow shutter speed lets in a lot of light, but can cause motion blur if subject is not still
  • ISO is the amplification of the sensor
  • HIGH ISO makes the image brighter, but creates noise
  • LOW ISO makes the image darker, but gives you the cleanest result

Photos by Froggie

You can find me here: [tumblr wishlist]

This is an example of the tutorial style posts you can find on the newly launched Frogman’s Light School. Eventually, we will cover a variety of topics at every skill level, from beginner to advanced, so keep checking back.

If you’ve been wanting to brush up on your photography skills, follow along!

noone-wouldriotforless:

Ahhhhh, New Zealand

So apparently that toilet had been a notorious cruising ground for a long time … a dirty cruising ground?It is funny to see this on official letter head though!

noone-wouldriotforless:

Ahhhhh, New Zealand

So apparently that toilet had been a notorious cruising ground for a long time … a dirty cruising ground?

It is funny to see this on official letter head though!